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Roll a Story: Mother Goose!

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Today’s activity is an awesome way to shake things up in language arts, get creative, and play! We’re bringing you a super fun printable that you can use to create imaginative stories and practice some sentence writing, too. This game is great for all ages!

If you are working with your elementary or middle school aged child on writing different types of complete sentences, you can use this activity to reinforce those grammatical principals. However, you can also use it as a critical thinking game with younger children by having them dictate their stories to you. This Roll a Story Mother Goose Activity can be used all kinds of ways, but all of them are sure to bring some fun to your homeschool!

What’s Included:

The printable includes 2 different build-a-story templates. One of these is already filled out with Mother Goose-themed prompts for characters, settings, and conflicts. The second build-a-story page has the Mother Goose characters but has blank spaces for you to create your own settings and conflicts! Also included are 4 story pages, each with its own picture box, so that your child (or children) can draw and write the story that they have created!

How to Play

Roll-a-story games are so much fun, and they’re easy to play, too! Just grab our printable pages, some dice, and a pencil. (Please feel free to print copies of these pages for each child in your household who’s participating. If you have friends or relatives who might enjoy this activity, please share the link to this article and let them download their own copies. This helps us so much, and we appreciate it!)

  1. First, look at the first page with the dice numbers and the designated prompts. Then have your child roll a die to choose a character. For example, your child may roll a 2, which (according to the prompt) means that the story must be about the “Dish and the Spoon.”
  2. Next, still using the first page, have him/her roll again to choose the setting. Let’s say the child rolls a 6 this time. In that case, the setting will be at midnight.
  3. Finally, have your child roll again to choose the conflict/problem. If your child rolls a 3, the problem is that the moon won’t come out.
  4. Once your child has these prompts, he or she will imagine and write a story that includes all of the story elements (and draw a picture, too!). If your child is younger or isn’t yet able to write the story independently, that’s ok too! Simply have him/her dictate the story to you. Then you can write it down using printable story pages (and maybe your child can draw the picture to go with it!).

If You’re Using These Printable Pages with More Than One Child

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