Dissolving Peeps Science Experiment

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Dissolving Peeps Easter Science Experiment

I don’t know about you, but when I think of Easter candy, I almost always think of Peeps! You know–those marshmallow chicks in all kinds of spring colors.

Easter science experiment

I don’t actually like to eat Peeps (even though my husband does. Yuck! But that’s a whole different story…), but they’re great for science experiments! If you have Peeps to spare this Easter, then you probably already have everything else you need to conduct this easy Easter science experiment!

Easter science experiment

Supplies:

You don’t need a lot of supplies! So even if you didn’t plan ahead, this is one of those Easter science experiments you can easily do with what you have on hand. I don’t know about you, but that’s my favorite kind of science experiment! When my children were all little, I sometimes needed something quick but educational to do with them (especially when it came to holidays–which tend to be busy times), and this definitely fits that situation.

6 cups water

1/2 cup sugar (divided)

1/2 cup salt (divided)

6 marshmallow Peeps

Easter science experiment

First, place 1 cup of water into three different cups. Into one cup, add ¼ cup sugar, stirring until it is dissolved. Into the second cup, add ¼ cup salt, stirring until dissolved. Leave the last cup of water alone. You simply need regular tap water (straight from the faucet) in that cup. NOTE: You’ll want to be sure to label the cups (as seen in the photo) so you’ll know what’s in each one.

Easter science experiment

Heat the remaining 3 cups of water until hot.

Place 1 cup of hot water into three different cups. Into one cup, add ¼ cup sugar, stirring until it is dissolved. Into the second cup, add ¼ cup salt, stirring until dissolved. The last cup will contain only hot water (nothing added). Again, be sure to label each cup.

Easter science experiment

Place one marshmallow peep into each cup of water. Set a timer for 2 minutes.

Easter science experiment

When the timer goes off, check the marshmallow Peeps and make note of which have changed. Use the printable form (link below) to record the time and the changes you observe.

Continue checking the marshmallow Peeps every 2 to 5 minutes (set a timer so you won’t forget to go back and check them), making note of the changes on the printable form.

Discuss which liquids caused the marshmallow Peeps to dissolve faster/slower and why.

NOTE: The timer I linked to on Amazon is a fantastic visual timer for kids! You can use it for cooking, as a timer for clean-up sessions, when you need to spend a certain amount of timer on a particular subject, or however else you want to use it! It allows your children to see a visual representation of how much time is left, and that’s super helpful to many children. So, while it’s technically not a kitchen timer, I use mine both in the kitchen and for school, etc.

Now all you need to do is click below to go to the Only Passionate Curiosity store to find and download your Dissolving Peeps Easter Science Experiment tracking sheet. Then grab those Peeps and get started! Oh, and I’ve included a few more articles and resources (under the link below) in case you’d like to have even more Easter-related educational fun with your kiddos!

 

CLICK HERE to go to the store to download your Dissolving Peeps Easter Science Experiment form to use for tracking the changes you observe!

Below, you’ll find links to even more Easter-related articles you might enjoy. There’s an Easter trivia game, a fun tutorial for dyeing eggs with shaving cream and food coloring, an ABC matching game, a number-matching game, and a jelly bean STEM activity!

But first, you might enjoy some YouTube videos about Peeps!

This video gives some fun information about the ways people use Peeps (besides eating them, of course). It gives some information about how the candy company was started by Sam Born, other inventions by Mr. Born, how Peeps production became automated, how Peeps are decorated, why people love Peeps, and more!
This video shares more information about how the company started and how Peeps went from being handmade to being automated. It also gives a little more information about how the Peeps are actually made (though they don’t give away too much).
If you have older children or teens, you might want to try making your own homemade “peeps.”
Do you prefer your Peeps stale? I know some folks like Peeps after they’ve had some time to sit. If this is you, try dehydrating your Peeps! It’s not the same as stale Peeps, but it’ll be fun to try.

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